Photo 17 Apr 1,196 notes
Photo 3 Feb 346 notes kateoplis:

“We conceive of time as a continuum, but we perceive it in discretized units—or, rather,as discretized units. It has long been held that, just as objective time is dictated by clocks, subjective time (barring external influences) aligns to physiological metronomes. Music creates discrete temporal units but ones that do not typically align with the discrete temporal units in which we measure time. Rather, music embodies (or, rather, is embodied within) a separate, quasi-independent concept of time, able to distort or negate “clock-time.” This other time creates a parallel temporal world in which we are prone to lose ourselves, or at least to lose all semblance of objective time.
In recent years, numerous studies have shown how music hijacks our relationship with everyday time. For instance, more drinks are sold in bars when with slow-tempo music, which seems to make the bar a more enjoyable environment, one in which patrons want to linger—and order another round.1 Similarly, consumers spend 38 percent more time in the grocery store when the background music is slow.2 Familiarity is also a factor. Shoppers perceive longer shopping times when they are familiar with the background music in the store, but actually spend more time shopping when the music is novel.3 Novel music is perceived as more pleasurable, making the time seem to pass quicker, and so shoppers stay in the stores longer than they may imagine.
Perhaps the clearest evidence of musical hijacking is this: In 2004, the Royal Automobile Club Foundation for Motoring deemed Wagner’s Ride of the Valkyrie the most dangerous music to listen to while driving. It is not so much the distraction, but the substitution of the frenzied tempo of the music that challenges drivers’ normal sense of speed—and the objective cue of the speedometer—and causes them to speed.”
Read on: How Music Hijacks Our Perceptions of Time

kateoplis:

We conceive of time as a continuum, but we perceive it in discretized units—or, rather,as discretized units. It has long been held that, just as objective time is dictated by clocks, subjective time (barring external influences) aligns to physiological metronomes. Music creates discrete temporal units but ones that do not typically align with the discrete temporal units in which we measure time. Rather, music embodies (or, rather, is embodied within) a separate, quasi-independent concept of time, able to distort or negate “clock-time.” This other time creates a parallel temporal world in which we are prone to lose ourselves, or at least to lose all semblance of objective time.

In recent years, numerous studies have shown how music hijacks our relationship with everyday time. For instance, more drinks are sold in bars when with slow-tempo music, which seems to make the bar a more enjoyable environment, one in which patrons want to linger—and order another round.1 Similarly, consumers spend 38 percent more time in the grocery store when the background music is slow.2 Familiarity is also a factor. Shoppers perceive longer shopping times when they are familiar with the background music in the store, but actually spend more time shopping when the music is novel.3 Novel music is perceived as more pleasurable, making the time seem to pass quicker, and so shoppers stay in the stores longer than they may imagine.

Perhaps the clearest evidence of musical hijacking is this: In 2004, the Royal Automobile Club Foundation for Motoring deemed Wagner’s Ride of the Valkyrie the most dangerous music to listen to while driving. It is not so much the distraction, but the substitution of the frenzied tempo of the music that challenges drivers’ normal sense of speed—and the objective cue of the speedometer—and causes them to speed.”

Read on: How Music Hijacks Our Perceptions of Time

via kateoplis.
Photo 11 Dec 628 notes calumet412:

A tug boat pulls a ship off Lake Michigan, west along the river, 1935, Chicago.

Imagine this.

calumet412:

A tug boat pulls a ship off Lake Michigan, west along the river, 1935, Chicago.

Imagine this.

Photo 24 Nov 2 notes just down the street from the cozy 18th century home we rented summer of 2011.  Oh, to own property in the Hudson Valley….

just down the street from the cozy 18th century home we rented summer of 2011.  Oh, to own property in the Hudson Valley….

Photo 23 Oct 28 notes calumet412:

The Chicago bottling plant of the Fred Miller Brewing Company (Miller High Life, The Champagne of Beers!, etc), 1895, Chicago.
MillerCoors is now headquartered in Chicago.
via MillerCoors.com

calumet412:

The Chicago bottling plant of the Fred Miller Brewing Company (Miller High Life, The Champagne of Beers!, etc), 1895, Chicago.

MillerCoors is now headquartered in Chicago.

via MillerCoors.com


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